Columns

 SAKRETE 01Here are some tips on how to be a 21st century contractor.   

By Cory Olson

One thing that all contractors have in common is an interest in cutting costs and getting new customers. Construction projects can very easily run over budget and get behind schedule, which can then limit the number of new customers you are able to take on. Thankfully, with all of the technology integrations available, alongside the increasing popularity of social media, there are many ways contractors can embrace the 21st century to increase profitability, ROI and bring on new clients. 

 LISA ANN MARCHESI 01Construction is only “a man’s job” if you only hire men.   

By Lisa-Ann Marchesi

Women make up less than 10 percent of the construction industry, according to the National Association of Women in Construction. While some would say there’s an easy explanation – that construction is “a man’s job” – I reject this thinking. 

 LEGAL RISKS 01There are some legal risks with BIM.   

By Jeremy P. Brummond and Patrick J. Thornton

The number of architects, design professionals and contractors that have been using building information modeling (BIM) has increased dramatically over the past 15 years.  BIM – which the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) respectively define as the “digital representation of the physical and functional characteristics of a project” and “the development and use of a computer software model to simulate the construction and operation of a facility” – allows for all project participants to more easily visualize the project’s design and collaborate on revisions and modifications.  

 JOBSITE EQUIPMENT 01Technology drives contractors to hold onto more revenue with less equipment.  

By John Kane

The old saying “possession is nine tenths of the law” is evident on many heavy construction jobsites, where the practice known as equipment hoarding threatens profitability. Owning or renting more assets is one solution, but construction fleet management technology is a better one, allowing contractors to schedule more effectively and minimize idle equipment.

 IRS AUDIT 01Here are steps to consider if your business becomes the subject of an IRS audit.   

By Gregory Seador

The Internal Revenue Service has ramped up its efforts to curb tax fraud in the construction industry. Just last month, two separate construction-related cases made headlines. In one case, the owner of several engineering firms was sentenced to five years in prison for failing to pay employment taxes and for diverting business funds for his personal use. In another case, a construction business owner failed to pay nearly $1 million in payroll tax withholdings to the IRS and now faces a maximum five-year prison sentence.

 IMPACT OF SOCIAL SECURITY 01Employers who receive no-match letters must avoid discrimination.   

By Becki Young

Since March 2019, the Social Security Administration (SSA) mailed no-match letters to nearly 600,000 employers – with the greatest impact on the construction, hospitality and agriculture industries. These so called “no-match” letters notify employers of a discrepancy between an employee’s name and social security number (SSN) against agency records.

 HANK WITHAAR 01Here are some top drivers of construction productivity.   

By Hank Withaar

Manufacturing products like cars and televisions have seen incredible strides in productivity as a result of advances in automation, robotics and improved manufacturing processes. These industries have benefited greatly from streamlined processes, which have enabled them to standardize the design and manufacturing of several million copies of essentially the same product, thereby increasing output for their companies. 

 CONSTRUCTION DANGERS 01The Safety at Heights Campaign seeks to prevent workplace injuries.   

By Charles D. Johnson

They’re headlines you never want to read: “Crane collapse kills four” and “At least one person is dead and six others injured.” Variations on those headlines swirled through the news media following both the April 27 collapse of a construction crane from atop a building in downtown Seattle, and the June 9 crane collapse in Dallas, respectively, in 2019.

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